2019 Italian Grand Prix

F1 Grand Prix of Italy, Circuit di Monza Italy

Date - September 8th, 2019

Reserve your 2019 F1 Monza Italian Grand Prix tickets and Italian Grand Prix travel packages. Don't miss our Formula One 2019 Italian Grand Prix ticket packages including your choice of hotels in Milan or Lake Como, 2019 Grand Prix of Italy race tickets, hospitality options and VIP transfers. As a USA based licensed Tour Operator we have been hosting guests at Monza since 1982.

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Your 2019 Italian Grand Prix Experience

The 2019 F1 Italian Grand Prix of Italy in Monza Italy. Of all the races on the Formula One calendar, the Italian Grand Prix at Monza just possibly generates the most electricity. As a licensed Tour Operator we have been providing travel packages and tickets to the Italian Grand Prix since 1982. The Italian Grand Prix fans (Tifosi) exude so much emotion that you can’t help getting caught up in the moment. The Italian Grand Prix track is situated in a public park in Monza, only about ten miles from downtown Milan. You can view the 2019 Italian Grand Prix from our Pitlane hospitality suite (Gold package), the VIP Paddock Club or grandstand of your choice. This is one of the most iconic Grand Prix events and not to be missed. Our 2019 Italian Grand Prix ticket packages include hotel stays in Milan or Lake Como, Grand Prix race tickets, hospitality options and VIP transfers so contact us for all the details. Reserve your Grand Prix package today to see the 2019 Italian Grand Prix at Monza.

ASK US about discounts if you reserve any 2019 Italian Grand Prix package and the Belgian Grand Prix the previous weekend or our Italian car factory and museum tour the following week.

2019 Italian Grand Prix Dates

Arrive Friday, September 6th and depart on Monday, September 10th 2019.

Arrive Thursday, September 5th and depart on Monday, September 10th 2019.

2019 Italian Grand Prix packages INCLUDE

  • Transportation between airport & hotel
  • Transportation between hotel & track
  • Accommodations for 3 or 4 nights at a 4 star hotel in Milan or Como with daily breakfast (including taxes)
  • Exclusive Pit Lans Hospitality credentials (Gold Package)
  • Silver section reserved grandstand or Gold section covered grandstand tickets for 3 days
  • Official Grand Prix program (Gold Package)

MILAN HOTEL

4 Star

Your hotel is a first-class hotel in central Milan, just a few blocks from the main Cathedral Plaza. The hotel has been recently renovated with traditionally designed lobby and elegant guest rooms. Other hotel amenities include a full service restaurant, multilingual staff and limited-hour room service.

COMO HOTEL

4 StaR

Palace, a proud member of the Villa d’Este Hotels, is an elegant 4-star hotel located in the heart of Como, overlooking the charming Lake Como. The hotel consists of the historical Palazzo Plinius wing – one of the oldest buildings in Como, and the modern Pianella annex, both offering wonderful lake views.

Check with us for additional hotel options and availability

Click Below For Your 2019 Italian Grand Prix Itinerary

Your Itinerary: May 9 or 10, 2019. 4 days – 3 nights or optional 5 days – 4 nights with arrival on May 10

Day 1: Optional Arrive Thursday
Thursday: Arrive and be greeted by the Grand Prix Club staff at the Airport in Milan (Malpensa) or make your way to the hotel. Private transportation to your Hotel in Milan or Como where you can relax from your flight. Evening gathering for cocktails with other guests then explore the many fine restaurants in nearby Milan.


Day 2: Optional day 1 for Friday arrivals.

Friday: Breakfast at our Hotel and then depart on our private transfer to Monza. Spend the day watching two Formula 1 practice sessions plus support races from your Grandstand Seats. Many other sightseeing opportunities in Milan or Como as well. Lunch at the track (GOLD package). Private transfer for the return to Milan or Como in the afternoon. Evening on your own.
(B) (L)  

Day 2 or 3:
Saturday: Breakfast at our Hotel and then departure on our private transfer to Monza to watch Formula 1 practice session plus qualifying. Lots of other track activity all day. Watch all the action from our VIP covered seats or from the VIP Pit Land hospitality facility (GOLD package). Catering throughout the day including great wines and food. Televisions also available in our VIP area plus the huge large screen TV directly opposite our location, you won’t miss a moment of action. Private transfer back to Milan or Como in the afternoon and your evening free.
(B) (L)

Day 3 or 4:
Sunday: Breakfast and then off on our private transfer to Monza for the races. Watch all the action from our VIP covered seats or from the VIP Pit Lane hospitality facility (GOLD package). Catering throughout the day including great wines and food (GOLD package). Televisions also available in our VIP area plus the huge large screen TV directly opposite our location, you won’t miss a moment of action. Full catering once more including Champagne to celebrate the Victor! Private transfers back to your hotel in the late afternoon and then enjoy your evening at one of the many fine restaurants in Milan or Como.
(B) (L)

Day 4 or 5:
Monday: Breakfast and then depart or if you are extending your stay we will be there to help you plan other activities.
(B)
(B) = Breakfast (L) = Lunch

Seating Details

The track is situated in a public park in Monza, only about ten miles from downtown Milan. You can view the 2019 Italian Grand Prix from covered grandstand seats (Gold Package) just across from the pits and directly opposite the big-screen television and start line, from the Ascari Chicane or  from the first chicane (open stands) . Silver Package seats in grandstand your choice of locations, some covered and opposite the Podium and Pits or elsewhere around the track. Add one of our VIP hospitality locations – either on the Pit Lane or choose the Paddock Club option with catering and pit passes each day.

2019 Italian Grand Prix 4 Day, 3 Night Options

Option A

4 Star Milan Hotel
Including Silver Section Reserved Grandstand Tickets
  • Friday Arrival
  • Hotel Accommodations in Milan
  • Private VIP airport transfers
  • Private VIP track transfers
  • Single Occupancy - $2595 Per Person
  • Double Occupancy - $2195 Per Person

Option B

4 Star Como Hotel
Including Silver Section Reserved Grandstand Tickets
  • Friday Arrival
  • Hotel Accommodations in Como
  • Private VIP airport transfers
  • Private VIP track transfers
  • Single Occupancy - $3095 Per Person
  • Double Occupancy - $2495 Per Person
Popular

Option C

4 Star Milan Hotel
Including Gold Section Covered Grandstand Tickets
  • Friday Arrival
  • Hotel Accommodations in Milan
  • Private VIP airport transfers
  • Private VIP track transfers
  • Saturday & Sunday Pit Lane Hospitality Food & Beverage Catering
  • Single Occupancy - $3695 Per Person
  • Double Occupancy - $3295 Per Person

Option D

4 Star Como Hotel
Including Gold Section Covered Grandstand Tickets
  • Friday Arrival
  • Hotel Accommodations in Como
  • Private VIP airport transfers
  • Private VIP track transfers
  • Saturday & Sunday Pit Lane Hospitality Food & Beverage Catering
  • Single Occupancy - $4095 Per Person
  • Double Occupancy - $3595 Per Person
Popular

Click below for additional Options

Still have questions?

2019 Italian Grand Prix 5 Day, 4 Night Options

Option A

4 Star Milan Hotel
Including Silver Section Reserved Grandstand Tickets
  • Thursday Arrival
  • Hotel Accommodations in Milan
  • Private VIP airport transfers
  • Private VIP track transfers
  • Single Occupancy - $2995 Per Person
  • Double Occupancy - $2495 Per Person

Option B

4 Star Como Hotel
Including Silver Section Reserved Grandstand Tickets
  • Thursday Arrival
  • Hotel Accommodations in Como
  • Private VIP airport transfers
  • Private VIP track transfers
  • Single Occupancy - $3695 Per Person
  • Double Occupancy - $2895 Per Person
Popular

Option C

4 Star Milan Hotel
Including Gold Section Covered Grandstand Tickets
  • Thursday Arrival
  • Hotel Accommodations in Milan
  • Private VIP airport transfers
  • Private VIP track transfers
  • Saturday & Sunday Pit Lane Hospitality Food & Beverage Catering
  • Single Occupancy - $4095 Per Person
  • Double Occupancy - $3595 Per Person

Option D

4 Star Como Hotel
Including Gold Section Covered Grandstand Tickets
  • Thursday Arrival
  • Hotel Accommodations in Como
  • Private VIP airport transfers
  • Private VIP track transfers
  • Saturday & Sunday Pit Lane Hospitality Food & Beverage Catering
  • Single Occupancy - $4695 Per Person
  • Double Occupancy - $3995 Per Person
Popular

Click below for additional Options

Still have questions?

A Short History of the Track at Monza for the Italian Grand Prix

The Monza track is one of five still existing racing tracks which hosted Formula One races in its maiden world championship season in 1950 along with Monaco, Silverstone, Spa and Indianapolis. Ever since that time, Monza has hosted F1 Grand Prix races every year, with the exception of the year 1980.

After England’s Brooklands Motor Circuit and the United States’ Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Autodromo di Monza is the 3rd oldest racing circuit in the entire world. Construction of the racing circuit near Milan began in January 1922 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Milan Automobile Club, with several Italian car manufacturers showing their support in the construction of a permanent track for both testing and racing.

The construction of the track was completed in record time of 110 days and the track was officially opened on September 3rd, 1922. The circuit had a combination of a 3.5 mile road track and 2.8 mile high-speed oval, which featured two banked curves that made the top speed of 118 miles per hour possible. Two different parts of the circuit were linked by two straights, each 3500 feet long.

In the history of Monza, the most serious racing accident took place in 1928, when an unfortunate racing mishap resulted to the death of 29 people, including a pro driver and 28 spectators attending the event. As a result, the Italian Grand Prix was temporarily confined to the high-speed loop layout until 1932. Moving forward, 1993 is another tragic year in the world of circuit racing as the event saw three deaths, prompting organizers to change the layout and add two extra chicanes for safety.

One of the major upgrades took place between 1938 and 1939, when the Milan Automobile Club (the owner) constructed new stands, resurfaced the Formula 1 Monza track and added two new bends. The new layout had a lap of almost 4 miles, which was in use till 1954. Because of World War 2, racing at the track was suspended until 1948, causing significant portions of the circuit to degrade in quality due to the lack of maintenance. But in 1948, Monza underwent renovations that allowed for the first Italian Grand Prix since the war ended. It was held in October that year.

Work on the circuit resumed again in 1954, with revamping the track being the primary goal. The new track had 3.5 miles with an added high-speed oval of 2.6 miles. The track layout was extensively updated to enable multiple cars to run parallel with each other and also to accommodate more spectators and teams. The Race of Two Worlds in 1957 and 1958 was one of the Formula One Circuit Italy’s highlights, when Formula One cars from Europe raced against America’s finest. The new circuit had separate areas for spectators. The central grandstand had a capacity of 3,000 seats and there were six additional grandstands with 1,000 seats each.

The most safety conscious years started after the death of Ayrton Senna in 1994. Monza has gone through significant change over the years as the Grand Prix of Italy became more and more popular.

The track was used for the Italian Grand Prix until 1961 with the 6.2 mile layout used in 1955, 1956, 1960 and 1961. The winners of those races were Sterling Moss (three times), Phil Hill (two times), Juan Manuel Fangio and Tony Brooks.

The 1961 Italian Grand Prix, with the tragic death of the Ferrari driver Wolfgang Von Trips and 15 spectators on the straight before one of the banked curves, marked the end of the high-speed track usage in the Formula One Grand Prix and other single-seater races.

The track was again used for the 1000 km Monza race of GT cars, sports cars, and prototypes. And in 1969, the final race was held on the longest Monza layout. After that, all races were removed to the 4 mile road course. Although the high-speed banking was retired, they are still there to see as a reminder to the glorious history of racing at Monza.

Despite the lack of high-speed banking in the track, the Monza circuit was still exceptionally fast. Because of the increasing performances of the cars and higher speeds, it became necessary to reconstruct the circuit to make racing safer.

Two chicanes were built in 1972 at the entrance to the fastest curves on the track – the Curva Grande at the end of the Start/Finish straight and the Ascari curve. The chicanes were named Variante Ascari and Variante Del Retifilo, but they soon became ineffective and were then reconstructed in 1976. Another chicane was added before the Lesmo corner. The new layout of the track was 3.6 miles long.

With technology improving and speeds still increasing, the track was modified again in 1979, with added curbs, extended run-off areas, and tire barriers improved. The infrastructure was also modernized with further safety improvements during the 1980s.

For the first and only time in the race’s history, the Italian Grand Prix was held outside Monza in 1980. Then in 1981, Formula One was back again in Monza, but with the addition of other events and series such as the Formula 3000 and the 1000 km of Monza were added.

In 1989, a major renovation of the pitlane, garages and paddock complex began, with lots of new technologies used. A few years later, the next focus was to increase safety standards, especially after Ayrton Senna’s death at Imola in 1994. All safety modifications shortened the track to 3.5 miles. The final change of the configuration and track layout happened in 2000, when the redesign of some curves resulted with the current track length of 3.6 miles.

The record holder in the current configuration of the track, with the official best lap time 1 minute 21.046s, is Rubens Barrichello. He set the record lap time driving the Ferrari F2004 in the 2004 Italian Grand Prix. During the qualifying, Barrichello made a lap 1m 20.089s, but Juan Montoya was even faster in the first qualifying session, and he lapped Monza with an average speed of 262.242 km/h, which is the fastest ever qualifying lap in the history of Formula One.

The feature that makes Monza really special is that it is an extremely fast circuit with tons of straights and fast corners, along with high average speeds. It was a place conceived for the cars and the drivers who want to achieve their full potential and reach high speeds without having to do much braking. That is the reason why racing in Monza is a big deal for both the drivers and the audience.

The high speed of the circuit has one huge downside, however, because Monza is regarded as one of the most dangerous tracks in the planet. Monza managed to take the lives of one track marshal, 35 spectators, and 52 drivers in a span of 78 years, from 1922 to 2000. The younger years of the track were especially deadly as there were instances when multiple drivers lost their lives in a single race. The most notable drivers who lost their lives at Monza were Ascari (1955), Von Trips (1961), Rindt (1970) and Peterson (1978).

The list of drivers who managed to bag victories at Monza is impressive and it also gives us a rundown of the motorsport’s rich history. A total of 51 drivers won the Italian Grand Prix from 1922 until 2018, with the list almost comprising of all world champions – from Nino Farina, the first world champion, to Lewis Hamilton, the current champion.

Michael Schumacher, who scored victories in 1996, 1998, 2003, 2006, and 2009, is the record holder at Monza with five victories – each of which was achieved with Ferrari. With 19 Grand Prix victories, the esteemed Italian manufacturer is the most successful brand at Monza. Coming second is McLaren with 10 wins, followed by Alfa Romeo with 8 victories.

Though Monza is widely known as the venue of Formula One races, other notable races from other series were also held there. The race with the longest tradition was the 1000 km of Monza, the endurance race which was a part of various series. On the 6.3-km circuit, the 392-km-long race Coppa Inter-Europa was first held in 1949. The race increased in size to 1,000 kilometers in 1954 and transferred to the 10 km circuit in 1956.

Despite the race having many different variations in both duration and longevity, it remained as the primary endurance race in Italy. Similar to Formula One, there were a lot of legendary drivers and cars that dominated the Monza circuit. Some of the famous winners were mike Hawthorne, John Surtees, Pedro Rodriguez, Arturo Merzario, Mario Andretti, Jochen Mass, Derek Bell, and many others. Ten drivers were the multiple winners, but only one scored three wins – Jackie Ickx. In 2008, the final 1000 km race was held as a part of the Le Mans Series.

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